Mystery Artist 32 – “B” Whale

Base of scrimshaw - mystery artist 32Looking up and into the center of the tusk/tooth - Mystery Artist 32Close-up of the initial "B" - Mystery Artist 32Severiano from Ohio writes: “I have had this for many years. Do you know who this artist is that signs with the letter “B” ?”

Whale on ivory just under the water

Not sure if this is a tusk tip or a whale tooth, hope to get a picture of the base.  My teacher Eduardo Brum would often sign his work with a single letter B as well, though it doesn’t give us much to go on. Purchased from an antique shop on Galveston Island Texas.

Mystery Artist 31 – W.E.S.

Back of a carved ivory cuff link with the initials WES - Mystery Artist 31

Carvings in ivory and bone are also considered scrimshaw, and these are a perfect example. Mark W. in Florida writes:

“I have attached three photos of a tie clasp and cuff-link set with the signiture W.E.S. or perhaps W.E. Sr..   Would appreciate help is identifying who it is.  Thanks.   Mark W”

These are beautiful pieces, the whale cuff links took patience to carve so small as well as a steady hand to attach them with those tiny screws.  Anyone know a scrimshaw artist with the initials W.E.S. that may have carved these or any information? We’d love to know.  Add your comments to the section below, Mark and I will be happy to know more about them.

Back of a carved ivory cuff link with the initials WES - Mystery Artist 31 The back of the other carved ivory cufflink with the initials W.E.S. Carved Whale Tie Clasp Mystery Artist 31 facing down

Mystery Artist 28 – “GH”

 

Butterfly scrimshaw on small cabochon
Mystery artist 28 – scrimshaw butterfly

Expertly crafted scrimshaw butterfly on diminutive oval cabochon. Initials GH on the back. Owner would like to know more about the artist and the piece. Feel free To comment in the section below.

Scrimshaw in a Bottle – How’d He Do That?



Charles Long bottled his own scrimshaw – literally!  This is how it was done:

The tell-tale signs of how Charles Long bottled his scrimshaw (hemistat marks left on the "faux bone" after heating it up and bending it into the bottle)

Charles writes:

 Faux Bone becomes flexible for about 25 seconds when heated.  That’s howlong you have to roll it up, stuff it, and try to flatten it out inside the bottle.

You can see the tread marks of my big hemostat on the right side below. Have learned hot not to do that anymore. “
Thanks for sharing your art and your secret with us Charles!  That was a great puzzler!